Newton Lake – A Rich History

Newton Lake – A Rich History

William Penn, Jr., a practicing Quaker, received a Charter to the land of the Pennsylvania Colony in 1681 from King Charles II of Great Britain. The Charter for 45,000 square miles was granted as the payment of a debt the King owed Penn’s father.

To solidify Penn’s ownership of the lands of the Pennsylvania Colony, he began purchasing these same lands via treaties from the Leni Lenape, the Native Americans of the Delaware Nation. After nearly a century of conflict with the Connecticut colony for the upper third of Pennsylvania (Pennamite Wars), the land disputes were settled by Congress under the Articles of Confederation in favor of the Pennsylvanians.

The first settlers began reaching the forested mountains and valleys of the northeast counties in the early 1800s. Greenfield Township, originally part of Luzerne County, was established in 1816.

The original land owners in Greenfield Township were issued patents (“deeds”) by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The two original land patents for the lands surrounding Newton Lake and Mud Pond (see the Map) were issued to Nathan Levering on April 30, 1787 and Samuel Meredith on October 24, 1800.